Agenda

TIME AGENDA  
09:00 Opening Address and Day 1 Highlights by Chairperson 
SCOTT-VALENTINE-roundedDR SCOTT VALENTINE
Professor and Associate Dean, Sustainability and Urban Planning
RMIT University
(Summit Chairperson)
RMIT
09:15
Visionary Keynote: From the Global to the Local – A Government Perspective
Kate-Wilson-roundedDR KATE WILSON
Executive Director Climate Change & Sustainability
Department of Planning, Industry and Environment
Department of Planning, Industry and Environment
RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN PLASTICS AND PACKAGING
 09:45 Panel: Government Grants and Incentives For Driving Australia’s Commitment to Sustainable Practices and Innovations in Circular Economy
Moderator: 

SCOTT-VALENTINE-roundedDR SCOTT VALENTINE
Professor and Associate Dean, Sustainability and Urban Planning
RMIT University

RMIT
Panelist:

MATT-GENEVER-roundedMATT GENEVER
Director Resource Recovery
Sustainability Victoria

Sustainability Victoria
Panelist:

Lesley-Fox-roundedLESLEY FOX
Senior Project Officer, Business Recycling Energy, Climate Change & Sustainability
Department of Planning, Industry and Environment

Department of Planning, Industry and Environment
Panelist:

PAUL-KLYMENKO-roundedPAUL KLYMENKO
CEO
Planet Ark Environmental Foundation

Planet Ark Environmental Foundation
10:15 Morning Refreshments & Networking Session
10:30 Fighting Single Use Plastic: How Globelet Will Track All Plastics to End Waste
Single Use Packaging is all around us. We all benefit from them. Yet globally they are proving to be an issue. Globally, 1.4 billion single-use coffee cups are thrown away each day. There is now a global problem with single-use packaging that is ruining the environment, unsettling communities and depleting our fish stock. In 40 years of plastic history only 14% of global plastic packaging was recycled. All the rest worth 80-120 billion is lost after only one single use. And nearly ⅓ of all plastic packaging leaks into eco-system where it can stay around for 100’s of years. By 2050 this means there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. Technology in the next 5 years will transform how packaging is used. Globelet is now tracking all plastics to end waste with QR codes.
ANDREW-GILHAM-roundedANDREW GILHAM
General Manager, Australia
Globelet
 globelet
11:00 Positive Tomorrow, Means Circular Today
How Australia Post can become the backbone of the circular economy, helping our customers solve problems by putting Australia Post assets to use in innovative ways.
Susan-Mizrah-roundedSUSAN MIZRAHI
Chief Sustainability Officer 
Australia Post
Australia Post
11:30
Towards 2025 National Packaging Targets
Brooke-Donnelly-roundedBROOKE DONNELLY
Chief Executive Officer
Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation
Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation
12:00 What Australia can learn from Finland, the world’s first country to legislate a national policy of circular economy development, to achieve zero-net GHG emissions by 2050, an estimated 100,000 new jobs by 2030, and increasing exports in technology and expertise
ANDREW-LANG-roundedANDREW LANG
Chair, Farm Forest Growers & Consultant
World Bioenergy Association
World Bioenergy Association
12:30 Networking Luncheon
13:30 Interactive Roundtable Discussion
  • Table 1: Governance & Measurement Framework to Support Sustainability
MARK-EIGENRAAM-roundedMARK EIGENRAAM
Director
Institute for the Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting (IDEEA Group)
IDEEA Group
  • Table 2: New Circular Economies Business Models
ANDREW-LANG-roundedANDREW LANG
Chair, Farm Forest Growers & Consultant
World Bioenergy Association
World Bioenergy Association
  • Table 3: Global Innovations in Sustainability Best Practices
DAVID-HODGE-roundedDAVID HODGE
Managing Director
Plastic Forests
fresh movement version 5 (editable source file for printers)
  • Table 4: The truth about green waste: An insight from the Urban Forest industry
MATTHEW-R-DANIEL-roundedMATTHEW R DANIEL
CEO
Global Urban Forest
Global Urban Forest
AWARD WINNING START UPS DISRUPTING SUSTAINABILITY WITH INNOVATIONS AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES
14:30 DyeCoo: Delivering Sustainable Apparels By Eliminating Toxic and Reducing Water Wastage Associated with Textile Manufacturing 
The textiles industry uses vast quantities of water and chemicals and produces huge amounts of toxic waste, which is a major problem in countries like China, India, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Thailand. But Dutch company DyeCoo has developed a process of dyeing cloth that uses no water at all, and no chemicals other than the dyes themselves. It uses highly pressurised “supercritical” carbon dioxide, halfway between a liquid and a gas that dissolves the dye and carries it deep into the fabric. The carbon dioxide then evaporates, and is in turn recycled and used again. 98% of the dye is absorbed by the cloth, giving vibrant colours. And because the cloth doesn’t need to dry, the process takes half the time, uses less energy, and even costs less. The company already has partnerships with major brands like Nike and IKEA.
KASPER-NOSSENT-roundedKASPER NOSSENT
Managing Director
DyeCoo Asia
 DyeCoo Asia
15:00 Afternoon Refreshments & Networking Session
15:30 Making the Circular Economy a reality: How innovator, Plastic Forests, is recycling problematic contaminated soft plastics and delivering tangible circular economy solutions
DAVID-HODGE-roundedDAVID HODGE
Managing Director
Plastic Forests
fresh movement version 5 (editable source file for printers)
16:00 Australia’s Leadership in Sustainability: How Close the Loop Built the World’s First Road Out of Plastic Bags, Glasses and Printer Cartridges
This Australian company has spent more than a decade recovering value from old printer cartridges and soft plastics. Their new innovation turns these materials into roads. The products are mixed in with asphalt and recycled glass to produce a higher-quality road surface that lasts up to 65% longer than traditional asphalt. In every kilometre of road laid, the equivalent of 530,000 plastic bags, 168,000 glass bottles and the waste toner from 12,500 printer cartridges is used in the mix. So instead of ending up in landfill, all that waste is given a new life, getting us where we need to go.
STEVE-MORRIS-roundedSTEVE MORRIS
Founder
Close The Loop
Close The Loop
16:30 Changing hearts and minds: the power of movement building in the fight against single use plastics’   

Tackling the problem of single use plastics has become one of the primary concerns of environmentally conscious organisations around the world. Footage of plastic gyres and increasing cases of sea life starving with stomachs full of plastic has shocked the world into understanding mass plastic use is a pressing issue. However, the ease, convenience and availability of plastic means it is embedded in our lives

Rather than cleaning up beaches or producing a disposable alternative, The Last Straw successfully challenged social and behavioral norms by asking Australians to do something a little inconvenient and stop using plastic straws unnecessarily. This disruption of the disposable, consumer-focused lifestyle prevented millions of straws from entering the waste system in the first place with a message to ‘just use less’. This session will observe The Last Straw and other environmentally focused case studies where movement building and campaigning tactics have been able to change the hearts, minds and habits of the general public when it comes to plastic waste, challenging a natural inclination towards ease and convenience.

EVA-MACKINLEY-roundedEVA MACKINLEY
Founder
The Last Straw Australia
 the last straw
 17:00 Q&A Session & Closing Remark by Conference Chairperson
SCOTT-VALENTINE-roundedDR SCOTT VALENTINE
Professor and Associate Dean, Sustainability and Urban Planning
RMIT University
(Summit Chairperson)
RMIT
 17:15 Champagne Networking 
image-3Enjoy a glass of champagne whilst networking with other like-minded individuals on topics that are of most interest to you and fellow delegates.
TIME AGENDA  
09:00 Opening Address and Day 2 Highlights by Chairperson 
SCOTT-VALENTINE-roundedDR SCOTT VALENTINE
Professor and Associate Dean, Sustainability and Urban Planning
RMIT University
(Summit Chairperson)
RMIT
09:15
Keynote: Circular Business Model Design – How Sustainability and Eco-Innovation Can Boost Bottom Line 
This session covers the $1 trillion market opportunity for businesses that effectively market themselves as eco-innovators; excelling in the 4 categories of sustainability – energy/water/waste, community, heritage and CSR – places companies into a different light with consumers. Also covered is how sustainability helps companies reduce annual operating costs and reach more consumers.
ANDREW-PETERSEN-roundedANDREW PETERSEN
CEO
Business Council for Sustainable Development Australia (Sydney)
Business Council for Sustainable Development Australia (Sydney)
John-roundedDR JOHN HEWSON
Chairman
Business Council for Sustainable Development Australia (BCSD Australia)
Business Council for Sustainable Development Australia (Sydney)
09:45 Low Carbon Living: Reducing Construction Wastes and Improving Sustainability with Circular Economy Modular Building

The construction industry is one of the most adversely impacting single industries in the world in terms of both waste production and greenhouse gas emissions. In Australia alone, construction and demolition waste represents about 40 per cent of its yearly waste production. In addition, during the buildings’ life cycle, further resources are consumed for maintaining and up keeping the building. This increase stems from buildings’ often low construction quality (e.g. single glazing in Australia is a common practice). As a possible solution to these issues, the circular economy framework is increasing in popularity, and in many industry sectors it provides promising guidelines to create new resources out of waste, reduce materials used, and design for reusability and recyclability.

The Legacy Living Lab or L3, is in fact built with reused modular frames, designed for disassembling and adaptable to future purposes. The L3 is ran with renewable energy, is movable and adaptable, and can be disassembled at the end of its life-cycle. Further, L3 measures and monitors the electricity and water consumption of its different spaces. Being a living laboratory means that the building also functions as a research facility. According to this concept, the L3 is designed to host start-ups which work in the field of renewable energy, buildings and automation, waste reduction and closed-loop supply chain are able to prototype, test and launch their products. Being a fertile space and research facility in the listed fields, the L3 helps industries and researchers to foster a change towards a reduction, reuse, and recycle revolution.

DEO-PRASAD-AO-FTSE-roundedSCIENTIA PROFESSOR DEO PRASAD AO FTSE
CEO
CRC for Low Carbon Living
 CRC for Low Carbon Living
10:15 Morning Refreshments & Networking Session
10:30 A Regional Approach to the Circular Economy – South Australia’s Journey 
  • The state of South Australia is recognized as one of the leaders in the Circular Economy. South Australia recycles 84% waste, generates 57% of its energy from renewable, and recycles nearly 50 GL of wastewater and storm water.
  • This presentation shares the journey of the state and explains how it has carefully considered and synergised key elements of the ‘Circle of the Circular Economy’ involving Preventative Policy Framework, Robust Technology, Market Instruments, Enforcement, Community Ownership and Systems Approach. The presentation will share not only what worked but more importantly what did not work in this journey.
HEMANT-CHAUDHARY-roundedHEMANT CHAUDHARY
Founder and Executive Director
Circular Economy Alliance Australia (CEAA)
 Circular Economy Alliance Australia
11:00 A collaborative approach to waste minimisation and long term sustainability outcomes.
How Veolia works with our customers across the commercial, municipal, events and education sectors to integrate sustainability into the value proposition and maximise social, environmental and economic outcomes.
FRANCESCA-STAFFORD-roundedFRANCESCA STAFFORD
Sustainability Coordinator
Veolia
Veolia
11:30 Recycling One Billion Takeaway Coffee Cups in Australia: Sustainable Packaging Best Practice
It is estimated that Australians use one billion takeaway cups annually, with 90 per cent of the vessels ending up in landfill, according to the ABC.

An Adelaide-based packaging company has come up with an innovative solution to the great takeaway-cup dilemma by designing a recycling system that turns disposable coffee cups into paper.

Detpak, a global producer of sustainable and customisable packaging, has launched the Recycle Me System. It has produced a cup with a detachable inner-plastic lining, which means the paper exterior can be recycled and reborn as paper.

Contrary to what many people think, takeaway cups are generally unrecyclable because they contain a plastic waterproof lining, which can’t be recycled. The Recycle Me System deals with that problem by making it possible to remove from the cup its non-recyclable component.

TOM-LUNN-roundedTOM LUNN
Group General Manager – Marketing & Innovation
Detmold Group
Detmold Group
12:00
Yarra Valley Water – Converting Waste to Energy
Organic waste destined for landfill is being turned into energy at Yarra Valley Water.
STEVE-LENNOX-roundedSTEVE LENNOX
General Manager Retail Services
Yarra Valley Water
Yarra Valley Water
12:30 Networking Luncheon
13:30 Fighting food waste using the circular economy: The role of the Fight Food Waste CRC
STEVEN-LAPRDGE-roundedDR STEVEN LAPRDGE
CEO
Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre (CRC)
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14:00 Victorian Government’s Strategic Vision for a Circular Economy 
ANGELA-HOEFNAGELS-roundedANGELA HOEFNAGELS
A/Director of Waste and Recycling
Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
 Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
14:30 Next Generation Sustainability Reporting     

There is a plethora of sustainability reporting initiatives available to the business sector. in 2012 the United Nations released the System of Environmental-Economic

Accounting forever changing the landscape for natural capital accounting. More recently the UNEP released the TEEB (The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity) AgriFood providing an innovative view of the circular economy but most importantly the need for systematic reporting on multiple capitals (human, natural, produced and social).

These innovations in ‘accounting’ for multiple capitals provides new opportunities for connecting with operational decision-making rather than the traditional standalone sustainability reporting that has occurred in the past.

MARK-EIGENRAAM-roundedMARK EIGENRAAM
Director
Institute for the Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting (IDEEA Group)
 IDEEA Group
15:00 Afternoon Refreshments & Networking Session
GLOBAL BEST PRACTICES IN SUSTAINABILITY INNOVATIONS
15:15 Case Study: Campbell’s Arnott’s sustainable environmental practices and social responsibility initiatives in Australia
Campbell Arnott’s Australia has spent decades honing its sustainability strategy and has a positive story to tell. Campbell Arnott’s Australia has been working with its suppliers to develop a consistent sustainability strategy. Learn more regarding the projects that led to the Australian Packaging Covenant Organization’s  Outstanding Achievement in Packaging Design and Overall win in the Food and Beverage Category. Including the redesign on Tim Tam and conversion to a recycled board for its Shelf Friendly Packaging.
LIZA-VERNALLS-roundedLIZA VERNALLS
Director, Packaging Development Asia Pacific
Campbell Arnott’s
 Campbell Arnott’s
15:45 Sustainability in Managing E-Waste with the World’s First Electronic Waste Microfactory: UNSW Innovations (or HYLA Mobile) 
Smartphones and tablets have changed the way many of us live and work, but our appetite for the latest must-have gadget has created a mountain of discarded devices. HYLA Mobile works with many of the world’s leading manufacturers and service providers to repurpose and reuse either the devices themselves, or their components. It’s estimated that more than 50 million devices have been reused, making $4 billion for their owners and stopping 6,500 tons of e-waste ending up in landfill.
VEENA-SAHAJWALLA-roundedSCIENTIA PROFESSOR VEENA SAHAJWALLA
ARC Laureate Fellow
Director
Centre for Sustainable Materials Research & Technology @ UNSW
 Print
16:15 Supporting Councils to go Circular With Organics
Gayle-Seddon-roundedGAYLE SEDDON
Program Coordinator – Directorate Strategy and Projects
Metropolitan Waste And Resource Recovery Group
 Metropolitan Waste and Resoure Recovery Group
 16:45 Q&A Session & Closing Remark by Conference Chairperson
SCOTT-VALENTINE-roundedDR SCOTT VALENTINE
Professor and Associate Dean, Sustainability and Urban Planning
RMIT University
(Summit Chairperson)
RMIT

 AGENDA 
POST SUMMIT SUSTAINABILITY INNOVATIONS SITE VISITS
SITE TOUR A: Close The Loop Site Tour
 10:00 – 11:00 Close the Loop was founded in 2001 with a brand promise of zero waste to landfill which provides us with very clear differentiation, both in our industry and in our geography. Industry-wise, we do not fit the mould of a recycler, we are the global leader in printer imaging consumable takeback programs but we are also an innovator and manufacturer, using the recovered materials as manufacturing inputs into new products such as asphalt additives.
In Australia, we are changing the game in asphalt roads through the addition of valuable resources recovered and/or diverted from landfill such as waste printer toner and soft plastics. Not only does this formulated product enhance the characteristics of asphalt making better quality, longer lasting roads, but also has a big impact on solving a major problematic waste issue in soft plastics.
Our circular business model has driven our competitive advantage. From personalised customer engagement via our Customer Service Team, to collection, sort, data capture and materials recovery, the focus is on retaining and providing value to our customers. In Australia, we have diverted more than 41 million printer cartridges from landfill, and globally more than 10 times that amount. We continue to pursue our R&D goals in asphalt additives, utilising valuable post-consumer materials diverted from landfill to provide economic, social and environmental value to our communities. We are viewed as a leader in circular economy solutions and we continue to partner with like-minded businesses to make better products and help them towards becoming more circular.
Site Visit
SITE TOUR B: Alex Fraser Group – Sustainable Supply Hub
 11:45 – 12:30

Alex Fraser’s new high recycled technology asphalt plant along with an innovative glass recycling plant was officially launch on May 31, 2019 by the Hon. Lily D’Ambrosio MP . An important development for Victoria’s circular economy. Every year, the new plants will produce 500,000 tonnes of green asphalt and recycle 1 billion bottles into quality construction sand. They join Alex Fraser’s one million tonne a year C&D plant at Laverton North to create Victoria’s first integrated sustainable supply hub. From a single location they are supplying recycled road base, aggregates, sand and asphalt needed to build greener roads and rail projects throughout metropolitan Melbourne. Their sustainable materials deliver significant commercial and environmental savings; reducing landfill, heavy vehicle movements, and the carbon footprint of new projects by up to 65 per cent.

Last month, Alex Fraser attended the 25th Anniversary of the Wyndham Business Awards where they took home the prize in the ‘Large Industrial’ category. Their Laverton North sustainable materials supply hub was recognised for its contribution to Wyndham’s community and environment. The award winning facility employs 118 people, many of whom live in the City of Wyndham and are all working together to keep waste out of landfill and build greener roads for Victoria.

GlassPlant_4837
SITE TOUR C: SMART Recycling Facility @ Southern Eastern Depot
 14:45 – 16:45

Smart Recycling and Smart Pallets operate from the Waste Converters site in Dandenong South. The businesses are owned by Ward Petherbridge. Ward’s father Geoff Petherbridge bought the site in 1982. At the time it was operating as a solid inert waste tip and sand pit. After time spent living in Europe and studying environmental science, Ward joined his father’s business in 1995 with a vision to turn the facility into a recycling business.

Today four businesses, that annually divert over 50,000 tonnes of waste from landfill annually, operate from the Waste Converters site:

  • Smart Recycling/Smart Pallets – recycling timber packaging, including pallets, crates and boxes and collecting, repairing and returning pallets for the brick, block and roof tile industries.
  • Commercial Tippers – Geoff Petherbridge’s business that recycles commercial & industrial and construction and demolition waste
  • EcoRecycle – Melbourne’s premier recycled mulch and landscaping specialist.
  • EcoCrush – Producers of recycled crushed concrete and brick aggregates for the construction industry.

The site transforms 95% of waste received into useful, cost-effective, environmentally friendly products and provides a net carbon benefit of 14,500 tonnes from timber recycling alone. We are pleased to announce that Smart Recycling has been nominated as a finalist in the 2019 Premier’s Sustainability Awards! And to top it all off they are building a State of the Art Waste Sortation Facility at the  Dandenong South Depot, which will be commissioned over the coming months. This new facility has the capacity to divert an additional 100,000+ tonnes of waste per annum from landfill!

Site Tour_new

Space in Each Site Tour is Limited, Registrations Will Be Available On First Come, First Reserved Basis